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CAMP WOOD STOVES

YUKON STOVE

Move mouse over the image to enlarge.

YUKON CAMP STOVE

  • GASKET ON DOOR FOR AN AIRTIGHT STOVE. Airtight stove allows for longer burn times and controls rate of burn better.
  • Reinforcement bars welded to top, both sides and back wilderness wood camp stove to prevent warping.
  • RAIN CAP WITH SPARK ARRESTOR. . Prevents rain and snow going into stove pipe. Much better than wire mesh spark arrestors on most stoves. Most other stoves do not have a rain cap.
  • Large adjustable air intake on door allows a hotter fire when needed on cold nights. Baffle behind air intake.
  • All stove accessories fit inside firebox.
  • 5" nesting stove pipe, 7' 8" long - smallest piece fits into next larger size, end of pipe is 6".
  • A 5" standard oval stove jack.
  • Warming trays - 25"l x 8"w, which can fit on either side of stove.
  • Stainless steel 3 gallon water tank - can fit on either side of Wilderness wood camp stoves.
  • Legs are 18" long. Which makes the stove top 6" higher than other stoves. Easier to cook on and easier to add wood. Also increases overall height at top of stove pipe by 6' as other stoves only have 12" legs. If you prefer, shorter legs - use a hack saw.

Yukon and Wilderness stoves have the exact same design specifications except the Wilderness is square and the Yukon is round. Both stoves effectively heat tents.

YUKON CAMP WOOD STOVE

5" Stove Pipe YUKON 3 YUKON 4   YUKON 5

0 DEGREES

Tent heating capability

14 x 16 16 x 20 18 x 24

- 30 DEGREES

Tent heating capability

10 x 12 14 x 16 16 x 20
Dimensions 26 L x 14 w x 12 h 26 L x 16 w x 14 h 26 L x 18 w x 16 h

 

SIZE OF FIREBOX/STOVE

 

2 CUBIC FEET 2.66 CUBIC FEET 3.42 CUBIC FEET
Burn time 6 to 8 hrs 8 - 10 hrs 10 - 12 hrs
Weight 56 64 72
Height with Legs 30" 32" 34"

STANDARD PACKAGE

stove, pipe, rain cap/spark arrestor, damper

 

$295

SPECIAL $270

$330

SPECIAL $300

$390

SPECIAL $355

DELUXE PACKAGE

Water Tank, Grate

stove, pipe, rain cap/spark arrestor, damper, shelf

$370

SPECIAL $350

$410

SPECIAL $385

$465

SPECIAL $435

Shipping $55
$65
$75
STOVE ONLY

 

$250

SHIPPING $60

$295

SHIPPING $70

       

CAUTION: Do not place a stove on any flammable surface. A fire proof 3' x 4'

mat is available for $35.

Photo-Click to enlarge
Item
Description Price Shipping Order
FIREPROOF MAT FOR
UNDER STOVE
3' X 4'
FREE SHIPPING
WHEN ORDERED WITH WILDERNESS TENT OR WILDERNESS OR YUKON STOVE
$35 $15

SAFETY/ SMOKE ISSUES: ALL SPARK ARRESTORS WILL BECOME CLOGGED WITH ASH AND SOOT. REMEMBER TO CHECK YOUR SPARK ARRESTOR DAILY AND CLEAN SPARK ARRESTOR AS REQUIRED. USING SOFT WOOD AND LOWER TEMPERATURE STOVE BURNS WILL CAUSE THE SPARK ARRESTOR TO BE CLOGGED SOONER. A CLOGGED SPARK ARRESTOR WILL CAUSE SMOKE TO ESCAPE FROM THE STOVE DOOR INTAKE AND WHEN OPENING DOOR. AND IN EXTREME CASES, A STOVE PIPE FIRE.

DAMPER: DAMPER MUST BE IN TOTALLY OPEN POSITION WHEN OPENING THE STOVE DOOR OR SMOKE WILL COME OUT THE STOVE DOOR. FOR DAMPER INSTALLATION VIEW WILDERNESS STOVE VIDEO.

 

CURING YOUR STOVE

CURING simply means baking your paint onto the stove. Always, always do the curing/first burn of your wood camp stove outside of your tent, preferably In your back yard. During the first burn there will be smoke and a very strong odor. You do not want this smell permeating the canvas in your tent. You and the tent will both have the smell of burnt paint.

Start your fire and fill your stove full of wood. Adjust the air intake on the stove door 1/2 open. The stove needs to burn at around 350 degrees for 3 hours to fully cure the paint. If you build too hot of a fire initially you will burn the paint off before the paint cures on your stove.

WALL TENT STOVE AND TENT STOVE INFORMATION GUIDE

Main Factors In Selecting a Camp Wood Stove
  1. Tent stove heating capacity
  2. Cost
  3. Weight
  4. Deciding on galvanized, titanium or steel construction
  5. Size
  6. Options and standard features available on a wall tent stove

Click Camp Wood Stoves for pictures and info on the 35 wood camp stoves and pack stove models by Cylinder Stoves, Four Dog Stove, Kni-Co Stove, Kwik Kamp Stove, Riley Stove, Mountaineer Stove, Titanium Stove, Sims Stove and Idaho Stove. I have a stove or pack stove that will meet your budget and requirement. Tent stove and camp wood stove prices start at $105.00.

Discussion of Camp Wood Stove Features

General: All my camp wood stoves have been used for many years and have proven their reliability. I have listed each stove's features thoroughly so you can compare and decide which stove meets your requirements and budget.

Cost: Camp wood stoves with the same gauge of metal (thickness) should be very close in price. When comparing camp stove wood models - ensure you add the cost of options you want as prices for shelves, water tanks and pipes vary significantly between stove companies.

Rolled Steel, Galvanized, Titanium Stoves:

  1. Galvanized - Galvanization helps prevent rust. A wise choice when buying a lightweight stove.
  2. Titanium - More resistant to burn through and warping. Stronger than steel and weighs about 50% less.
  3. Rolled Steel - Non galvanized and will rust quickly if left outside.

Tent Heating Capacity: Most camp wood stove models state the very largest tent the stove will heat. You should consider the next larger stove model to ensure you have a warm tent especially for drying out wet clothes and boots if you plan on using a stove in the cold winter months.

Collapsible Stoves vs Non-Collapsible: Stove that collapses for compactness . Unless space is a critical factor, a non-collapsible stove is recommended.

Pellet Stoves: Stoves that burns pellets. Used in environments where wood is unavailable. Some models of pellet stoves burn pellets or wood. Riley Pellet stoves have a proven record of use for over 20 years.

Double Wall Stove: Riley camp wood stove models stoves are the only lightweight tent stove company that have both a double bottom and double wall. (Colt models and larger) Riley stoves makes a high quality lightweight camp wood stove because the double bottom reduces the chance of a bottom burn out. Riley double wall camp stoves are durable and heat efficient.

Weight: Stoves that heat a 12'x14' tent can weigh 30-40 pounds. If you need a stove at a base camp or tent camping near a road buy the camp stove wood model you need regardless of size or weight.

Packing: Packing smaller stoves fit into panniers easily or as a top pack. Larger camp wood stoves can also be easily fit into larger panniers.

Features and Options: Most wood camp stoves have the same options and features except rain caps and grates. However, some of the smaller stoves do not have a water tank or shelf that fits into the firebox due to the stove's size.

Storing and Transporting: I prefer a camp stove wood model that all the accessories fit inside of the firebox for ease of transporting and storing.

Stove Metal Thickness:

  1. Gauge - The lower the gauge number, the thicker the rolled steel or galvanized steel. Thicker metal increases strength, durability and weight.
  2. Metal Thickness - common gauge thickness used in tent stove construction:
    1. 10 gauge .135 inches
    2. 12 gauge .105 inches
    3. 14 gauge .074 inches
    4. 18 gauge .05 inches
    5. 22 gauge .03 inches
    6. 24 gauge .024 inches

LIGHTWEIGHT CAMP WOOD STOVES TO PACK IN:

  1. Individuals packing in normally take a lightweight camp wood stove. However, some individuals take a heavier stove and "cache" it if they use the same hunting camp every year. However, in US Forest Service land, wilderness areas, and state forest land cacheing is not legal.
  2. Collapsible stoves fold down on themselves and are occasionally used by packers. Only about one half of the stove space on a pack horse is saved because the stove pipe and any other accessories must also be packed in. Stove pipe and accessories normally fit inside the firebox of a normal stove. The biggest drawback of a collapsible stove is that the firebox is not airtight.
  3. Lightweight wood camp stoves primary drawback is the thin metal bottom will burn through much faster than the heavier metal camp wood stoves. I recommend you put one inch of dirt inside the firebox to reduce the heat on the bottom of the stove firebox. The two most common lightweight stoves used for packing in are the Riley Stoves and Kni-Co stoves. The larger Riley stoves, Colt and larger, have double walls and double stove bottoms and are very durable. However, the Riley stove is much more expensive than the Kni-Co single wall and bottom stoves.
  4. A damper for your stove is strongly recommend. I hunt in Wilderness areas and all wood has to be cut by hand. A damper makes your stove 10-15% more efficient. Which means you will reduce the amount of wood you have to cut by 10-15% if you use a damper. This 10-15% increased stove efficiency is very important when you cut wood by hand.

The Yukon 5 camp wood stove is a heavy stove and is not recommended for packing in on horses unless you have an exceptionally strong horse.

Horse Packing a heavy stove is difficult even for an experienced packer. iI is best to pack a heavy stove on the side of a horse. However, you will have to have a corresponding heavy pack on the other side to balance the load.

Packing a heavy stove as a top pack is not recommended and very dangerous. If the top pack stove suddensly shifts to one side there will be a wreck which can be very dangerous, especially, on narrow mountain trails.

The following was sent to me by an experienced packer in Australia. Very interesting reading and some very good pack tips for individuals interested in packing.

G'Day,

I read you section on pack tips with interest and you have some excellent
ideas obviously picked up from going bush. However this is an experience that is slowly being lost because people don't have those old skills much anymore.

I am not an old packer(in Australia we call them horse tailers!). I am only
in my early 40's but packed for several years when I was a ringer (cowboy) when I was in my late teens so my first role was as horse
tailor. We also have bullock tailers because they tailed bullocks and
sometimes we call them drovers This art is getting lost!.

We do things a bit different here because we don't have a lot of fences,
bears, large populations on wanabesand and big outback isolated stations,
and many of the things I learnt are now lost because people have no bloody idea about camp horses( cow horses for mustering(rounding up), and the old ways are getting lost because the old blokes and woman are heading for the happy hunting ground!

I tailed (looked after) a mob (herd) of plant horses (workers) on a large
station (ranch) which had around 43,000 head. So they was no wheels and horse work was all year round. We used packs because it was a muddy sort of place when it rained. (Australia has an internal drainage system not like places where rivers drain to the sea! so vehicles (even ww2 tracked vehicles and those things like off the banana splits were unsuitable and the noise stirred up the mob.

I still pack today and use exactly the same methods, much to the chagrin of my friends. When I was horse tailor I looked after 60 head of plant horses called a string in a stock camp. A stock camp went for most of the year and we camped out bush under the stars in all weather That's where I learnt from their aboriginal stockman the stars and how to track!. Our pack horses never had halters and I caught each out on the flat (open space) because we don't have things like wire fences in those days. So when we saddled up in packs we drove them in a mob and did that real slow so they could feed as they moved to the next camp site.

Each ringer was responsible for his own pack. Every pack had a purpose. eg my pack was the heaviest and was the meat pack. It kept the meat, butchers knives, sharpening stone, potatoes and oranges. Another bloke might had the hobble pack, so it keep the spare leather, saddle stitching and repair gear, hobbles, shoeing gear, spare shoes etc, and a carbide light, which carbide was a rock that reacted with water and gave off acetylene gas and when lit gave a flame or light at nighttime. So each person had a pack to ten to every morning and night. Some packs carried water! Other packs carried ammunition for the rifle as we butchered cattle on the open for food and salt to preserve meat etc. We ate sparingly and meat each night had to be hung in a tree to keep the ants off them and dry out so as not to go rancid. Meat was placed in a calico bag to dry out the blood.They would last up to 2 weeks in wintertime and Australia can get bloody hot!

I packed between 8 -10 neddies(horses). That meant 8-10 pack saddles and each man had his pack like I described. Young colts getting broken in had a pack but you filled the pack bags with sand for extra weight. So each morning each man had a designated pack and his job was to pack it properly and weight it ready for me to saddle up. The other horses left were for mustering so about 6 head for each stockman or ringer (cowboy so they rotated each horse several times a day so they didn't knock up(exhausted them) There were about 7 ringers so we had a few spare horse as well.

Breaking in(training from scratch) was all done out on the flat. Which meant no yards or fences to catch them. Each night we hobbled every horse and like you said we put horse bells on the ring leaders or the ones with mates at home so they were prone to head home and had horse bells on them. My job was to listen to which direction they went and at day light the bells were tongued to reduce the clanging. Having 70 plant horses meant I had to keep on the ball! so to speak, and they all got to know mw very well. It was an unwritten rule none touched the plant except me so as no to stir up the plant with unfamiliar people!. I got to love each horse really well and I had absolute power. If anyone knocked a horse around I had the power to go crook and let them know they were up to no good. Another unwritten rule of the Australian bush! Those animals became my pets!

They were never fed so they grazed at night and they always were in good nick(condition() because there was plenty of feed and I never knocked then around.

One point you forgot was watering and hobbling. You NEVER hobbled before watering. Do this and you will kill your entire plant! This is because thirsty horses must be watered first! before they walk off camp. So if they drink in a creek they get the hind foot over the hobbles and floundered and drown. This is a drovers first priority! and should never be forgotten!!!!

We never had fancy tucker(food). A good horse tailer had a camp cook to help and always carried a stock whip to keep the horses them in line. The horse tailors job was to get the water in a can or the cook to cook, dig a hole for scraps, and get firewood for cooking food. A night log was the order of the day so in the morning hot coals were ready for breakfast. Each horse got to know only the tailor so when the ringers wanted to catch their work horse for the morning I took their bridle and caught their horse, lead it off camp, and handed it over. It was one of the unwritten rules you never entered the horse tailors domain.

On camp meant you trained the horses to stand patiently in front of the camp fire, each morning and night to be caught, hobbled and then let go. You never chased then off camp but let then make their own way off camp.

Most of this work "on and off camp" was done in the dark so the boys could go mustering early. So a good tailer got to know his plant by sight and shape in the dark. You always tried to made sure you took horses with their mates so they hung together, That meant one "mate" always carried the horse bell so you could catch them in the early morning. You might have 10 bells so you had to learn the different sounds

The time to get them was when the morning star Venus" was just above the horizon before setting. This was around 4.00am or 3.30am So you never used a watch.

To catch them one horse called the night horse was tied up to a tree. He got special treatment because without him you couldn't get the others who grazed all night. The night horse got a nosebag of grain and he had his own special fire with smoke to repel mozzies. because in Australia we have bad mosquitoes and they annoy the buggery out of a tethered horse. He got lots of special attention because if the battle rushed he was relied upon to see in the dark. The night horse was chosen because of their extra powers of night sense, alertness, quietness and trusts, so they were special. Unfortunately people use electric fences these days so this is lost almost. If we night watched cattle we had several night horses tied up and rode around them singing to pacify them. Night watch was hard but being horse tailor I always got first watch. The jingle of a hobble chain could rush the mob. Our mobs were about 1000 head. The most I saw was about 3000 but with so many we had to split them into 3 mobs!

Sometimes we had clean skins, cattle that never got branded as calves, They sometimes became unmanageable as they were uneducated, so we had to toss them. This means gallop after them, jump off grab their tail and when they turn to horn you flick their tail towards their head and they over balance, there is a special moment to do this so you need a mate on horseback to back you up if their tail had so much manure on it your hand slipped off. Your mate also had to hold your horse and then we would kill the beast called pithing it. This meant putting a pocket knife in the par where the skull ,loins the soine and cutting the nervous chord --instant death!

This method in Australia is called throwing or tossing cattle. Not many
can do this now as well!

All pack horses were crossed with a Perce so half draughts. All pack
bags had holes in the bottom because we swam them many times as the country became boggy when wet. We slept in a swag and this was strapped to the top of the pack saddle. Also a rifle shovel and axe was strapped there as well. They were very good animals, calm and sensible having the draught in them.

These methods were developed by the British Army in India I believe, so the packs we use here were based on the British Army Military pack. That's probably why there were so many unwritten rules. I have never forgotten this work. People don't know this stuff now.
regards.

Gerard Hogan
National Coordinator for Viticulture
Cooperative Research Center for Viticulture(CRCV)



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PACK SADDLE SHOP
3071 West Twin Road, Moscow Idaho 83843, 208-882-1791, 2002
208-882-1791, 1-800-234-1150, FAX: 208-882-4297
support@packsaddleshop.com